They Came, They Saw, They Foiled….Vineyard Cup 2015

An Event Like No Other

From Press Release: (Sail Martha’s Vineyard)

Martha’s Vineyard is in full swing this time of year and it’s not just the Island that
has been hot. On July 10-12 the waters off Martha’s Vineyard played host to one of the most unique Regatta’s to ever take place.  88 boats ranging in size from 12 feet to 81 feet shared the water with 30 Foiling Kiteboards competing for $10,000 in the cash purse compliments of Lynch and Associates.

Sustainability for the Future

For 2015 the Vineyard Cup is building on its sustainable roots. For the past three years Sail Martha’s Vineyard has been moving up the ranks in the Sailors for the Sea Clean Regatta initiative but this year decided to go a step further by committing to serve all Local food, which was either grown, raised or landed on Martha’s Vineyard.

This included greens and tomatoes from Island Grown Initiative, Chickens from Morning Glory Farm, Oysters from Honeysuckle Oysters and Pigs from The Good Farm among other Island purveyors.

In addition the event attempted to be a Zero Waste event, meaning that all food would be composted, all containers recycled and anything that can be reused will be reused. In the end we had 1 yard of trash, 90% of which was from the packaging of materials provided to us by outside companies.

Maritime Heritage with a Progressive Thought Process

While Sail Martha’s Vineyard started with simple boat building and learn to sail programs back in 1992 it has grown immensely with classes ranging from Coastal Navigation to High School Vocational to Rowing to Captains License Testing. At the heart the organization still offers Island Children the opportunity to learn the skills of sailing for free. This in itself is a huge undertaking with 400 children taking to the water this summer alone.

 

Donna Lange is on Her Way Around the World…Again!

Donna Lange’s send off party date was chosen months prior to the actual event, as is the case when reserving a fancy venue like the Herreshoff Marine Museum. But as the date for her second solo circumnavigation departure snuck closer, her to-do list remained long and stressful. But she did what any good sailor would do – continue to prepare like mad with lots of help and new equipment to tweak, learn and ultimately shake down. And when the date arrived and she wasn’t quite ready to go – and you DON’T GO around the world ill prepared – she went through her ceremonial send off, with plenty of fans and fanfare and even a canon salute and sailed off into the…. harbor.

Wisely and with much admiration for the guts, not only to know when to “hold ’em” but also for sailing around the world alone, Donna chose to carry on with the farewell and then have a little shakedown cruise around Bristol Harbor. She then returned back to her mooring and the work continued. No one at Donna’s send off could begrudge her for not sailing off into the sunset. She has done this “around alone” thing before and everyone there seemed to understand her focus and determination and support her in every decision she made.

She received many new pieces that were integral to her voyage. New pilot kites in the event of a mast failure, new Harken winches and blocks, new sails, a buoyancy system of inflating airbags, new solar and wind power, new lines and leads and many many other new complicated systems that required serious installation and education for a successful voyage.

So just yesterday, on July 31st, with a rare summer Bristol Harbor northerly morning breeze, she hoisted her sails and headed south out of Narragansett Bay. Her website is tracking her position (that she cannot see) and she will update us and her website via satellite connection to email and single sideband radio.

Farewell Donna and we wish you a safe and comfortable voyage. She plans to head across the Atlantic and down the coast of Africa and around the Capes in the Southern Ocean. With no electronics or GPS aboard, she is depending on her newly honed celestial navigation skills to guide her around the oceans. And when she pulls back into Bristol Harbor next spring, we will be there to greet her and congratulate her on being the first American woman to solo circumnavigate nonstop. And TotalBoat will have done the voyage around the world with her…and that, too will be a cool thing to celebrate.

GO DONNA!

O’Pen Bic RI Intergalactics Were a Blast!

IMG_1950A forecast of 20+ knots and hazy, hot and humid weather did NOT deter the 60+ junior sailors yesterday at the O’Pen Bic Intergalactic RI UnRegatta. It was a huge success with super swag, amazing prizes (Thanks, Charlie Enright for the signed shirt off your back for first place prize!) and some super FUN and sweet sailing in our secret cove.

With a variety of exciting courses set up by the Mike3 RC, (3 Mikes busted butt to put this thing on. All other Mike’s invited to help next year! And many other volunteers were paramount to the event’s success, like Scoring Goddess, Nina M.) the kids had a blast and were treated to some super fun and challenging sailing in Gull Cove.

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Every sailor was paired with another in anticipation of switching off and a building afternoon breeze which lent itself nicely to sailing with a buddy.  Courses were set up for some crazy buoy racing, a capsize race where all sailors went for a swim when the horn sounded, a stand up course where you had to stand for the whole race! and some wacky, narrow navigating around rocks and squirt gunning teammates through a slender cut about as wide as the trailers used to bring the boats to the event.

Ice Cream and pizza was served for all and new friends and awesome memories were made.  The winning team of Olin Guck and Ronan M. were surprised with an epic first place prize of signed Team Alvimedica shirts from our hometown hero Volvo Ocean Race skipper, Charlie Enright. (see last photo in slide show of a very stoked first place winner!)

These fun UNregattas which have become an O’Pen Bic thing, are a great way to run a junior sailing event. The focus was on involving everyone, having fun, staying safe and fast, awesome sailing!

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED! Thanks to all the Mikes, all the volunteers and to the yacht clubs, parents, coaches and sailors who showed up with their FUN factor in place and raring to go. Let’s do it again next year!  (or go to Hyannis, MA on August 11 for the next nearby UnRegatta!)

Fun movie from GoPro footage coming soon! If you have footage to submit for inclusion, please send to kristinb@jamestowndistributors.com
And if your kid is begging: Buy your own O’pen Bic here!

‘Vanishing Sail’ – A Movie Not to Miss

When the movie Vanishing Sail premiered for the first time ever in late April in St. Barth’s – we urged you all to fly down and catch this great movie in plein air – because after all, who doesn’t need a “jaunt” to St. Barthelemy for a good flick about wooden boats?

Well, maybe you didn’t make it. (I got held up here – couldn’t get down there…) Happens. You now have another chance to catch this film in it’s full length glory at the Newport International Film Festival this coming Wednesday, Aug 5th. Complete with a pre-screening party at the always entertaining Newport Shipyard, the filmmaker Alexis Andrews and the Carriacou Sloop, Summer Wind will be at both the pre-party and the screening.

Pre-Screening party at the shipyard is from 5-7pm. Screening is at Jane Pickens at 7:30pm.

Get Tickets for Vanishing Sail – Newport Film Festival (7:30pm. Wed. August 5th)

Info on Pre-Screeining Party at Newport Shipyard

http://www.vanishingsail.com/

Read more about Vanishing Sail in our TBS post from April 30. 

See you there! Continue reading

Intergalactic O’pen Bic Regatta – LIVE Broadcasting Today!

Today is the day! The kids are ready! The boats are ready. The swag and freebies and water guns and ice cream truck are locked and loaded… It’s the first ever Intergalactic O’Pen Bic RI Championship and man, are we excited.

YOU CAN TUNE IN LIVE on Periscope on your mobile phone for LIVE broadcasts at Noon and 2pm Eastern Time and maybe a few other times when the action heats up. If you follow us on Twitter (@TotalBoatShow), it will tell you when we go LIVE at some fun, unannounced times….

Download the Periscope APP on your iPhone or mobile device and follow TotalBoat Show. Then tune in on the app at noon and 2pm and check in on the fun in the cove. The kids will be racing – but this is not your typical around the buoys, windward/leeward – NO WAY! This is Unregatta Style: fun challenges and games mid race to keep the racing fun and low key.

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Timelapse of Superyacht Build: We So Don’t Care!

It takes lots of materials to build a 226 foot superyacht. And wouldn’t we love for all the adhesives and paints to be TotalBoat….? We haven’t cracked the SuperYacht market yet, but mostly because we like to concentrate on the smaller DIY boater – the boatbuilder working on a masterpiece, the guy in his basement or workshop out back using his hands to feel and shape a hull form until it’s right.

So forgive us for overlooking this massive industry where bigger is better and oversized is over budget and there is little imagination for things we love – like wooden rub rails, oar locks, lapstrake hulls, a finely painted topside job, a home built hull, the 8th coat of varnish or is it glass?… and so on.

We don’t care about SuperYachts. We care about you and your projects, questions and challenges. Because when you conquer your own boatbuilding project – and you know all the names of the builders and products used – somehow your dream boat is closer to our vision for TotalBoat. And we care about that.

Tips from a Shipwright: Laminating Wood

Louis Sauzedde, the master shipwright and YouTube star, has shown us many ways to make boat work easier with the Tips from a Shipwright video series. In this follow up video to an earlier Part 1 video, he goes deeper into the steps for laminating wood with epoxy, in this case on the frames of his own 8-Meter sailboat in the midst of a total restoration.

Let us know what you think of Lou and his ‘Tips from A Shipwright’ videos. He certainly presents lots of experience and some sage advice in each and every one and we like to think that even though you might not also be restoring an 8 meter or laminating planks on your wooden boat, that these videos have great appeal to those of us who are enchanted with all boats. Are we right? Or are you in the midst of this very project awaiting this video to tell you how to make it through these steps? Probably not, but just like you might not be overhauling the family station wagon, you might be one of the lovers of TV shows like Monster Garage or Pimp My Ride for the entertainment value. And we think there is none better than LOU for our own wooden boat building version of these how-to shows.

So have a look and enjoy the project at hand, especially if you don’t have to worry about every detail on laminating your own boat’s frames.

Making You Look Good by Making Us Work Hard

This ^ is ERIC. TotalBoat Show peeps, meet the brains behind the product testing and lots of the product development at JD/ TotalBoat. Eric works tirelessly to run and maintain the TotalBoat Workshop where we test and test and test again each and every TotalBoat product we sell and many we are working on developing. He is a boat owner, a DIY-er, a TotalBoat video star and a friendly face in the JD storefront on occasion – amongst many other things.

You might recognize Eric from many of the Product videos on TotalBoat’s You Tube Channel (are you a subscriber? please subscribe!) and you will continue to know Eric as the TotalBoat video king, helping you get your projects done well through our series of Product Breakdown videos and popular How-To videos.

Recently in our customer survey, we discovered that you all LOVE our videos and we are thankful for that. Because we believe that when we can simplify and help you with your boating projects – whether it’s with our great Tech help team that you can reach on the phone or even video chat with (yes! you can FaceTime our tech help to show them your project!) or by creating great how-to videos – that you know we have you covered and we CARE about how your project turns out. ERIC cares about how your project turns out. He does. And just the other day here, we were jammed in a hot boat with a nasty bilge, making a video about how to best UN-nasty your bilge using (of course) our TotalBilge Paint.

 

See? See how happy Eric looks to be helping you get your bilge looking marvelous?

It’s just another example of how Jamestown Distributors and TotalBoat are doing everything possible to make sure you have everything you need – including the know-how – to nail your project and make your boat better with less stress and at a great value. Period. We care. Now go subscribe to our YouTube Channel, pretty please. Thanks! And stay tuned for this great video about spiffing up your bilges. Coming soon!

Happy Monday!

 

James Dodds: 
Drawn to the Form

We catch up with boatbuilding’s artist laureate
Story by Steffan Meyric Hughes / Portrait by Emily Harris
Article courtesy of Classic Boat Magazine

Forget… just for a heartbeat or two… James Dodds’s long career in art. Forget that he is one of the few marine artists to have broken free of the marine niche into the wider art world. And set aside the fact that he is the de facto artist laureate of Britain’s littoral working craft, perhaps even Britain’s leading living marine artist. Instead, shut the door on the present, and hang a sign on it that says… Gone paddlin’.

Well, what else would we do? James has a new toy that he has taught himself to use – a tandem sit-on-top kayak – and he’s dug a channel through the narrow stretch of mud between his studio and the River Colne so he can launch it in situ. The tide’s up, the sun’s out and the river’s surface is a luminous, brown glitter-scape, as we pass a man battening down his Folkboat. Soon, I will have to ask searching questions like “what is your favourite colour?” (indigo) and when I’ve gone, a summer gale will replace me, harassing this gentle spot and its ageing cabin yachts that forever swim against the tide at their moorings. But right now, where else would we rather be than paddling upriver on the last of the flood?

As we move steadily up the Roman River to Fingringhoe Mill, James tells me about the local area. Like every coastal town in the southeast of England, the shipyards have become flats and houses and the fishing fleet has disappeared, bar four stout-looking craft in the tiny town dock. Cook’s Shipyard was the last builder of any consequence and near it, a large, metal engraving on a plinth is the most visible reminder of the town as it used to be. It’s by James of course, and one of those old sheds is now his studio. From his talk and from his long, low paddle strokes, the impression is of a man as comfortable in his environment as he seems to be in his own skin. 

Much has been made over the years over the similarities and differences between James’s subjects and his depictions of them. A four-year shipwright’s apprenticeship in nearby Maldon after leaving school (aged 15) in the early 1970s has given James a profound feel and respect for the craft of the boatbuilder; not to mention a fondness for the sort of stout repartee that is sometimes enjoyed by men who work with their hands… “They called me the artist in residence when I worked at the yard,” he recalls. One can only imagine the joshing James sustained during those years, as he carved lino-cuts of the boats in the yard.

At the end of the four years James, still only 19, went to Colchester School of Art, then the Chelsea School of Art and the Royal College. The art critic and painter William Packer who taught James at Colchester wrote in 2006 “James Dodds is not just a remarkable artist: he has been one from the start. What marked him out was not just his comparative maturity among his fellows, but that he seemed even then to know exactly what he wanted to do. Such predisposition can well be an irritation in a student and a provocation to his teachers, but it proved to be quite the reverse in his case. Far from being narrow or obstructive, least of all arrogant, he was clearly anxious to learn all he could.” (Jamie’s version, with his gentle self-effacing humour, is “people used to tell me I took myself too seriously”.)

For that reason, there has been a great stability to James’s work during his long career (he has sold nearly 300 oil paintings, not to mention countless lino-cuts, wood-cuts and hand-printed books). William Packer’s comment seems to ring true – here is not a person who has invented himself over the years as most of us do, but who knew his mind from the start.

   

As we walk around his studio, James explains the process behind one of his typical large oils. He prepares his canvases the old-fashioned way, by applying two layers of rabbitskin glue (which has to be reconstituted from desiccated crystals), then two coats of white lead primer, which has become almost impossible, and very expensive, to get hold of since the EU banned it. Continue reading

Tall Ships Challenge 2015

With only 4 stops along the Atlantic Coast, the 2015 Tall Ships Challenge was known mostly this summer for the special guest appearance of the Tall Ship L’Hermione from France. The Tall Ships Challenge 2015 brought this fantastic voyage of the French tall ship into the limelight, as the replica visited all 4 ports with her fellow tall ships and added another 5 Atlantic ports to her own itinerary.

Hermione is an exact replica of General Lafayette’s 18th-century ship also called the Hermione. Today, the majestic vessel is the largest and most authentically built Tall Ship in the last 150 years. The Hermione has set sail in France, launching an adventure that comes to the USA in the summer of 2015 for an unprecedented voyage. Her route is similar to the route taken by Lafayette when he came to the States in 1780 to meet George Washington. She came ashore from her transatlantic voyage with 80 sailors, making landfall on June 5 in Yorktown in Virginia, where US troops led by George Washington and French soldiers accompanied by General Lafayette scored a decisive victory over the British in 1781.

“The Hermione, the ship that reunited Lafayette and Washington and sealed our freedom, sails again for America,” trumpets the website promoting the reconstruction of the epic journey. Lafayette’s willingness to support the American Revolution was symbolized by his arrival on Hermione who sailed him to Boston, MA in only 38 days.

The project is the brainchild of a group of history and sailing enthusiasts who two decades ago embarked on the arduous task of recreating the vessel using only eighteenth-century shipbuilding techniques.

Not to be overshadowed by this great ship, the TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE® Series of international sailing races, cruises, and maritime festivals is organized by Tall Ships America in cooperation with Great Lakes, Atlantic and Pacific Coast port cities in the United States and Canada. This summer was the Atlantic Coast’s turn at hosting the 2 month long event, with great interest in the 4 ports of call, as is typical when these majestic ships sail into town.

If you live near Portland, Maine, Greenport, NY or Portland and Castine, Maine you might have had the opportunity to see these ships up close for yourself. They are now onto their other summer sailing and sail training, but this video from the Greenport, NY stop shows the beauty a crowd of tall ships lends to any dock or pier.

And if you’re near Boston this weekend, you can tour America’s largest tall ship, The USCG Cutter Eagle. At 295 feet in length, the Eagle is the largest tall ship flying the American flag and the only active square-rigger in U.S. government service. She will be docked at Pier 4 at the Charleston Navy Yard as part of the 2015 cadet summer training deployment.

EAGLE will be open for free public tours:

TODAY!  – Saturday: 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sunday: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Did you catch L’Hermione on her US tour? How about any of the other tall ships? Let us know in the comments below!