Acorn to Arabella: The Vlogging Boatbuilders

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In case you’ve been sleeping under a rock without wifi for the past few years, the hot trend for those under 70 with a boat to build, is to document it on video. Sharing the build on YouTube is the plan for most “vloggers,” (Video bloggers are called “Vloggers”) and we couldn’t be happier about this! We have a long list of these boatbuilding vloggers that we like to follow, and amongst them is the dynamic young duo from the Acorn to Arabella series.

Over on our other blogroll, at TotalBoat.com, the readers have been eating up these updates from the Arabella work shed, a backyard bimini set up (ok, fine, it’s better than a bimini, it’s a full blown, shrink-wrapped workshop) in the back yard of the builders, Alix and Steve. These motivated men have decided that despite their lack of sailing ability (as in, they have never sailed. Ever!), that they are building an Atkins Ketch from scratch.

In the most recent episode we featured, they toured us through a rotting Atkins hull that they picked up and plan to use for all the beautifully intact bronze bits and pieces. These two are into recycling at it’s very best, and you’ll know if you watched our Vela Restoration series (and you should…), that we love it any time you can recycle old parts (or old hulls, as was the case with Vela). Giving new life to old things is worthwhile, especially when boats are involved. You’re better off with the “tried and true,” as opposed to the “brand new” often times with boating. If a part or piece has been through the ringer in the marine world, most likely it’s built to last, because most parts that aren’t, are long gone by now.

Head over to TotalBoat’s blog and catch up there with our Acorn to Arabella posts and see what we’re so excited about.

 

 

A Stiff Breeze and A Sweet Restoration

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When it’s blowing 35 knots, are you running for cover or aiming your bow towards your next harbor? It probably depends on the size of your boat – but these salty sailors aboard Adix, a 212-foot, Gaff-Rigged Schooner, see the stiff breeze as an opportunity for a fast delivery to Bermuda from Newport, some 700-plus miles away. They hoist lots of canvas and set sail for a rockin ride over the Gulf Stream and down to Bermuda. Since 35-knots is a bit much for most of our smaller boats to handle, my interest is piqued when I get an opportunity to watch a video of someone else doing it. And so it was with great interest that I tuned in to watch Leo’s video of delivering Adix south, expecting some gnarly seas and sweet footage from aboard this classic beauty, but what I found was much, much more. Leo, as it turns out, is restoring Tally Ho, an old wooden English Gaff cutter from 1910 and he has his own series on YouTube and website. Wild wind AND a YouTube boat restoration series – SOLD!  Continue reading

Vanishing Sail at the Wooden Boat Show: A Boatbuilding Film

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The Journey of Summer Wind, the inspiration for Vanishing Sail
No.8 Antigua Slipway, 2008

After sailing Summer Wind up and down the islands for 8 summers, I had decided to build a larger sloop with Alwyn and his sons and sold the vessel to a gentleman who began his own love affair with her. And after several years getting to learn her particular ways and also running aground on most of the reefs surrounding Antigua, she required a considerable amount of repairs. Originally fastened with house nails, they had been slowly but surely rusting away in her deck beams allowing rainwater to seep in and cause plenty trouble & rot. This is the story of Alexis Andrews and Vanishing Sail. 

Stop by our booths in Tent A, Come meet shipwright Louis Sauzedde and see the TotalBoat Work Skiff, then catch a screening of Vanishing Sail. It’s an amazing story of Caribbean boatbuilding and preserving a trade and a family tradition that risks falling by the wayside.

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Restoring Classic Hulls in the Workshop

 Water to wine: Nicer Cabin Shape for GRP Classic

When Mike Zani moved to the banks of the Sakonnet River in Rhode Island, he wanted a beautiful yacht for his mooring but was not willing to pay $50,000 for one of the fine-lined modern/classic daysailers on the market today, writes Chris Museler.

A cool $4,500 bought him a 1962 Cape Cod Marlin, a GRP derivative of L Francis Herreshoff’s Fish Class design, but with a blister cabin house and a strip of opaque GRP in place of portholes (ugh!).

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Boats Worth Restoring – SeaCraft City

We love old boats around here. Wooden boats, fiberglass boats, power or sail – we love [mostly] all of them and a good portion are worthy of your time reading about them here… and our time restoring them, making them perform better, be safer and ALWAYS look better.

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We bring you this video below of the restoration of a 23-foot Seacraft becuase the folks at Metan Marine are like-minded pros who see the value in saving, bettering and bad-assing up these classic hulls. Older Seacrafts are somewhat of a cult classic – and I say so, because I speak from experience. As the owner of a 1974 Potter built SeaCraft Sceptre, we have invested time and money into preserving this awesome hull and plan to continue to upgrade each system until it’s like-new.  Continue reading

Join us for SHOP NIGHT on the TotalBoat LIVE Shop Cam

As Shop Night gets underway for the 2016-2017 season, we invite you to come behind the scenes into the TotalBoat Shop via our new LIVE ShopCam.  We meet every Wednesday evening to get dirty and get our boats in better condition for next summer.  Our ShopCam can move around, and if you like something you see, we can move the cam closer to let you see more.

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TotalBoat Shop Night is Underway!

It’s been a great season out on the water for the TotalBoat team, but the time has come in Southern New England to put the boats away and get to work on improvements, general maintenance or upgrades for next summer.

We have a number of exciting projects coming up this winter and we are excited to share their progress with you weekly on TotalBoatShow.com and on the new official TotalBoat website.

Check them out here… Continue reading

Building the TotalBoat Work Skiff: Edging the Bottom Planking (Episode 16)

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The bottom planking on the TotalBoat Work Skiff is arguably the most important part of the boat as it’s submerged most of the time and will be charged with taking the brunt of any seas or swell that it will encounter.  Follow along in our latest episode as Louis explains how to cut the planks for length and accuracy. Using his electric joiner, Lou takes 1/16th of an inch off each side in a single pass to perfect the edges of each bottom plank. Continue reading

Building the TotalBoat Work Skiff: Checking for Symmetry (Episode 14)

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Louis Sauzedde is feeling the love from his fans and is plugging away at getting the skiff completed. We are releasing these videos at almost the same pace as the skiff build, which allows Lou to address some of your questions in the videos themselves. In this episode, Lou gets right to addressing your concerns over what exactly was making his drill put on a smoke show in Episode 13. Once he consoles you and your power tools, he checks to be sure that the side planks of the boat will not influence attaching the bottom planks. Lou’s biggest concern is that the skiff is being built symmetrically – and he takes the time in this episode to check his work thus far. Twice.

Enjoy! And leave your comments and questions for Lou below. We always pass them on and try to answer!

Building the TotalBoat Work Skiff: Time for Planking (Episode 13)

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Finally, it’s time to join Louis Sauzedde in his workshop to attach the first planks to the frames we saw him hang in last Friday’s Video of the Week. last week. With more of his special tricks up his [cut off] sleeves, Lou and Andrew carefully clamp, pre drill and attach the beautiful wooden planks to the frames.

If you recall from Episode 1, these planking boards were among the first steps of the build, chosen right away for their grain characteristics. This commitment to plank quality proves that Louis really does consider every inch of the boat, from the screws to the color and grain of each plank.

Welcome back as we get into the meat of the planking with Lou in Episode 13 of Building the TotalBoat Work Skiff.