Waterlust’s Teardrop Camper – Almost Done!

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The Waterlust team is finishing up the construction elements on the teardrop camper they are building. They designed and built a new storage box to add functional options for storing all their equipment under the trailer and while it raised their kitchen operations in the aft end, it’s worth the trade off for tidy, accessible areas to stash their gear.

With the all of the epoxy jobs completed and cured, the team is looking forward to sending the teardrop off to a paint shop for a pro spray paint job and we can’t wait to see what it looks like after. They will also be preparing the epoxied storage box for a DIY paint job which we are helping them accomplish with some Wet Edge paint and primer we sent down their way.  Continue reading

Rocking the Boat

Rocking the Boat situated in the Bronx, NY, has brilliantly reached out to kids who might need distraction in the form of function, art and certainly boating! Read about “Rocking the Boat” and watch the video about their admirable mission to get kids into and conquering projects they never thought possible.

Jamestown Distributors has been donating to this amazing program for years and they, in turn, have been excellent customers. It is so satisfying to be able to contribute to organizations like Rocking the Boat and see the love for hand crafting, wood working and boating be passed along to kids who might never have had the chance to hold a tiller or a plane. Constructing and rowing your own boat is a project that reaches so many important levels of being a responsible human. There are lessons in crafting, woodworking and in life that manifest themselves throughout a build project and getting kids excited about it all is even more of a victory than the finished product.

From RTB Vimeo Page: Adam Green believes in teaching 21st century job and life skills through old fashioned wooden boat building.

The idea first infected him as a Vassar College student in 1996, when he spent a “semester abroad” volunteering at a middle school in East Harlem—one of the U.S.’s poorest urban neighborhoods at the time. Despite having no prior boat building experience, he worked with students to make “Dolphin,” an 8 foot wooden dinghy which was launched in the school swimming pool.

After graduating, Green returned to New York City with a certificate to teach, but gave up that plan to launch Rocking the Boat—a boat building and environmental education program which now serves 2,000 youth and community members annually in the South Bronx. The aim is not to turn kids into professional boat builders, but to help them recognize abilities they possess that will help them thrive in school and beyond.

Rocking the Boat empowers young people from the South Bronx to develop the self-confidence to set ambitious goals and gain the skills necessary to achieve them. Students work together to build wooden boats, learn to row and sail, and restore local urban waterways, revitalizing their community while creating better lives for themselves.

Kids don’t just build boats at Rocking the Boat, boats build kids.

HOW COOL IS THAT? Support Rocking the Boat by donating here.

Design & Construction Talk about the VO65’s

It’s interesting to check back on this older video posted at the initial stages of this 2014-2015 edition of the Volvo Ocean Race. Having decided on doing one-design boats for more level competition, the boats are a  collaboration between many designers, yards and builders.

And now that the boats have safely crossed all the oceans of the race (with only 3 short legs remaining up the coast of Europe with a finish in Gothenburg, Sweden) it is safe to declare that they must have really been built well, as there were very few structural or mechanical breakdowns. It has been a mercifully non-eventful event for the shore crew and the sailors. Everyone is in one piece and aside from the obvious boat damage sustained when Team Vestas Wind smashed into a little island (ok, a reef) requiring a full repair back at Persico Marine in Italy, all the boats have fared well. And this can be directly attributed to smart sailing,  a great and sturdy design for the boats and rigs and great boatbuilding.

Kudos to all the involved boatbuilders and designers. The VO65 is here to stay for the next edition of the race, presumably in these very hulls which might owe part of their structural soundness to the fact that they were actually built to be used for 2 races.  It’s been a real pleasure to watch the teams conquer the seven seas in boats that don’t appear to be too light or under built.  Let’s not forget that this race has evolved from massively heavy and well appointed boats who were built to sail around the world. The evolution to light-as-possible racing machines is a good one, and dare we say that the new one-design element has been a great addition to the race, forcing skill and experience of the crew to the surface.

However you slice it, the boats are built with as much modern technology and state-of-the-art go-fasters onboard with the simple goal of winning the race by being the fastest around. The days of pushing as hard as possible, testing the limits of the boat and it’s construction are here to stay. And It’s nice to be able to see how these boats were conceived and built to endure everything the mighty ocean and the sailors who push as hard as possible can throw at them. The boats – all of them- and their designers and builders are all winning. The ultimate winner, though, is yet to be determined… time will certainly tell that story.